• University of New Brunswick: Jean Rooney, HeyDay, 2013, UNB Art Centre
  • University of New Brunswick: New Brunswick College of Craft and Design, Diploma Graduate Exhibition, 2013, UNB Art Centre
  • University of New Brunswick: Edward Burtynsky, Material Matters, 2013, UNB Art Centre
  • University of New Brunswick: Dennis Reid, Landmarks and Legends, 2013, UNB Art Centre
  • University of New Brunswick: Wilma Needham, Souvenir, 2014, UNB Art Centre
  • University of New Brunswick: Wilma Needham, Souvenir, 2014, UNB Art Centre
  • University of New Brunswick: Alanna Baird, Plenty of Fish, 2014, UNB Art Centre
  • The Banff Centre: Rebecca Belmore Ayum-ee-aawach Oomama-mowan: Speaking to Their Mother, performance, presented by the Banff Centre, 2008 (Photo by Sarah Ciurysek)
  • The Banff Centre: Figure in a Mountain Landscape, artist sketching at Burstall pass (Photo by Kimberley Simpson)
  • The Banff Centre: Brian Jungen, The ghosts on top of my head, 2010-11, painted stainless steel, Gift of Doug, Linda, Sarah, and Ian Black (Photo Laura Vanags)
  • Art Canada Institute: Online Art Book, Michael Snow: Life and Work, by Martha Langford
  • The Gail and Stephen A. Jarislowsky Institute for Studies in Canadian Art, Concordia University: Martha Langford, François-Marc Gagnon, and Sherry Simon
  • Art Canada Institute: Online Art Book, Jack Chambers: Life and Work, by Mark A. Cheetham
  • Canadian Studies, University College, University of Toronto (Photo by Christopher Dew)

Researchers

Sara Angel
Leanne Carroll
Mark A. Cheetham, Principal Investigator
J. Keri Cronin
Sarah Dick
Peter Dykhuis
Maureen Engel
Annie Gérin
Emily Gilbert
Martha Langford
Ken Lum
Erik Moore
Erin Morton, Co-Investigator
Charlene Quantz-Wold
Julia Skelly
Carla Taunton
Daina Warren

Sara Angel

Founding Executive Director, Art Canada Institute
Trudeau Doctoral Scholar, University of Toronto
Web site | Email

Sara Angel is the ArtCan Partner Representative from the Art Canada Institute and a member of the Projects and Initiatives Working Group. She is the Founding Executive Director of Art Canada Institute and a PhD candidate in the Department of Art at the University of Toronto. She is the recipient of a Trudeau Doctoral Scholarship, the most prestigious award of its kind in Canada, given "for innovative ideas that will help solve issues of critical importance to Canadians." She is also one of the country's leading visual arts journalists and writes frequently on contemporary visual culture for publications including Maclean’s, Canadian Art, The Walrus, and The Globe and Mail to make the world of art accessible to a broad audience. Her academic writing has appeared in the Journal for Canadian Art History and Leonardo, the Journal of the International Society for the Arts, Sciences and Technology.

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Leanne Carroll

Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow, Department of Art History and Archaeology, Washington University in St. Louis
Web site | Email

Leanne Carroll is an ArtCan Collaborator and was the Associate Research Director and Project Coordinator of ArtCan from April 2013 to April 2015. She coordinated ArtCan activities, assisted the ArtCan Executive and Steering Committees, liaised with ArtCan Working Groups and art galleries, and supervised undergraduate and graduate ArtCan Work Study students. She received her Ph.D. in Art History from the University of Toronto, where she held a SSHRC Canada Graduate Scholarship and a Massey College Junior Fellowship. Her areas of research and teaching interest include twentieth- and twenty-first-century art, art theory, art writing, aesthetics, feminism, and historiography. She is working on a manuscript that grows out of her dissertation, which examined artists’ writings since the 1960s. She has presented and published papers analyzing the influence of Immanuel Kant on Clement Greenberg (Canadian Aesthetics Journal, 2008) as well as the art and writing of Robert Morris (University of Toronto Art Journal, 2008), of the Abstract Expressionists (at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, 2011 and in RACAR, 2013), and of 1960s New York artists (in Not a Day without a Line: Understanding Artists’ Writings, Academia Press, 2013).

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Mark A. Cheetham, Principal Investigator

Professor, History of Art, University of Toronto
Web site | Email

Mark A. Cheetham is a member of the ArtCan Executive Committee and is Chair of the Steering Committee. He writes on art theory, art, and visual culture from c. 1700 to the present and is active as a curator of contemporary art. His co-curated exhibit Jack Chambers: The Light From the Darkness / Silver Paintings and Film received an OAAG “best exhibition” award in 2011. In 2006, he received the Art Journal Award from the College Art Association of America for “Matting the Monochrome: Malevich, Klein, & Now.” His book Artwriting, Nation, and Cosmopolitanism in Britain: The “Englishness” of English Art Theory was published in 2012 by Ashgate. Remembering Postmodernism: Trends in Canadian Art, 1970–1990 appeared in a second, revised edition with Oxford UP in 2012.

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J. Keri Cronin

Associate Professor, Visual Arts, Brock University
Web site | Email

Keri Cronin is an ArtCan Collaborator and led the workshop "Creature (Dis)comforts" at the Banff Centre in May 2014. She is Chair of the Visual Arts Department at Brock University. She is also a Faculty Affiliate in Brock’s Social Justice & Equity Studies graduate program and a member of the Faculty Steering Committee for the Social Justice Research Institute at Brock. She is the author of Manufacturing National Park Nature: Photography, Ecology, and the Wilderness Industry of Jasper (UBC Press, 2011) and the co-editor (with Kirsty Robertson) of Imagining Resistance: Visual Culture and Activism in Canada (Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2011). Her current research explores the ways in which late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century animal advocacy groups used visual culture in their campaigns. In the summer of 2012 she curated an exhibition called Be Kind: The Visual History of Humane Education for the National Museum of Animals & Society (NMAS) and is currently serving as the Chair of the Advisory Council for NMAS. As part of her commitment to knowledge mobilization beyond traditional academic audiences, she writes a monthly column called “Picturing Animals” for the online magazine Our Hen House.

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Sarah Dick

Registrar, The Beaverbrook Art Gallery
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Sarah Dick is an ArtCan Collaborator and a member of the Digital Technology Working Group. She has been an undergraduate student supervisor in UNB’s Faculty of Arts Internship: Community-Based Learning programme since 2009. As Registrar she administrates the Beaverbrook Art Gallery’s collections database and her expertise in relation to ArtCan lies in her ability to train students on the BAG’s current database program and familiarise them with the collection. She will supervise an undergraduate student research assistant from UNB in year two of the granting cycle and provide ArtCan with access to the BAG’s collection for digitization.

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Peter Dykhuis

Director/Curator, Dalhousie Art Gallery
President, University and College Art Galleries Association of Canada
Web site | Email

Peter Dykhuis is an ArtCan Collaborator and Chair of the Public Outreach and Knowledge Transfer Working Group. He is a visual artist and a curator who represents university and college art gallery professionals nationally. He brings important perspectives on universities’ collecting and curating. He will edit an Ideas Stream on this topic and organize a caucus at the Universities Art Association of Canada in order to gather research for ArtCan’s website.

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Maureen Engel

Assistant Professor, Humanities Computing, University of Alberta
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Maureen Engel is an ArtCan Collaborator, a member of the Steering Committee, and a member of the Public Outreach and Knowledge Transfer Working Group. She is Acting Director of the Canadian Institute for Research Computing in Arts. She is co-investigator on the Edmonton Pipelines | Narrating Digital Urbanisms project, where her “pipelines” aim to technologically intervene in our notion of what urban space is, and how we constitute and are constituted by it. Formally trained as a textual scholar, her background is in cultural studies, queer theory, and feminist theory. Her principal research area is the spatial humanities and the intricate relationships that inhere in and develop from the concepts of space, place, history, and narrative. Her associated research interests include: networked culture, social media, augmented reality, and locative media.

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Annie Gérin

Professeure et directrice, Histoire de l’art, Université du Québec à Montréal
Editor, RACAR
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Annie Gérin is an ArtCan Collaborator and member of the Steering Committee. She is a curator and associate professor of art history and art theory. She is also Chair of UQAM’s Department of art history. Educated in Canada, Russia, and the UK, her research interests encompass the areas of Soviet art, Canadian public art, and art on the World Wide Web. She is especially concerned with art encountered by non-specialized publics outside the gallery space. Her recent publications include Godless at the Workbench: Soviet Humoristic Antireligious Propaganda and the co-edited collections Cultural Poesis: Essays on Canadian Culture,Public Art in Canada: Critical Perspectives,and Oeuvres à la rue: pratiques et discours émergents en art public.

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Emily Gilbert

Former Director, Canadian Studies Program, University College, University of Toronto
Associate Professor, Dept. of Geography, University of Toronto
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Emily Gilbert is the ArtCan Partner Representative from the Canadian Studies Program, University College, University of Toronto. Her current research deals with questions relating to citizenship, security, migration, borders, nation-states, and globalization. She is engaged in two primary research projects. The first is an examination of battlefield compensation that is being made in cases of inadvertent death, injury, and property damage. This research is situated within a broader concern for how war restructures the ways that lives are valued (or not). A second line of inquiry is on the changing politics of the Canada-US border. She examines the ways that border risks—economic and social—are being used to discipline behaviour and promote new forms of citizenship practice, particularly with respect to migration and mobility. In addition to these two primary areas of research, she continues to have a strong interest in visual and literary narratives, especially urban and wilderness representations of Canadian national identity.

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Martha Langford

Research Chair and Director, Gail and Stephen A. Jarislowsky Institute for Studies in Canadian Art, Concordia University
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Martha Langford is an ArtCan Collaborator, the Partner Representative from the Jarislowsky Institute, a member of the Steering Committee, and Chair of the Future Projects Working Group. She is a professor in the Department of Art History at Concordia University. She is also editor-in-chief of the Journal of Canadian Art History/Annales d'histoire de l'art canadien and co-editor, with Sandra Paikowsky, of the Beaverbrook Foundation Series on Canadian Art History of McGill-Queen's University Press. Langford has written the first comprehensive survey of modern Canadian photographic art: "A Short History of Photography, 1900-2000," in Anne Whitelaw, Brian Foss, and Sandra Paikowsky, eds., The Visual Arts in Canada: The Twentieth Century (Oxford University Press, 2010). Her research on visual artist, filmmaker, and musician Michael Snow has resulted in numerous articles and conference papers, as well the Art Canada Institute online art book Michael Snow: Life and Work (February 2014). Her writing on photography and video addresses mediated experience in relation to constructs of memory and imagination. Her books include Suspended Conversations: The Afterlife of Memory in Photographic Albums (McGill-Queen's University Press, 2001) and Scissors, Paper, Stone: Expressions of Memory in Contemporary Photographic Art (MQUP, 2007). Her edited collection, Image & Imagination, published in both English and French editions (MQUP, 2005), featured original essays by American, Australian, and British scholars. Her studies of vernacular photography include A Cold War Tourist and His Camera, co-written with John Langford (MQUP, 2011) and “Strange Bedfellows: Appropriations of the Vernacular by Photographic Artists,” in Photography & Culture 1:1 (2008). Working with a team of graduate students, Langford is developing a common research tool for Canadian photographic studies, to be launched in 2014. As director and research chair of the Jarislowsky Institute, she is initiating and/or participating in projects initiated by Institute members and their partners in investigations of local, regional, and national institutions that have defined and produced Canadian art in all media. Such projects include Networked Art Histories: Assembling contemporary Canadian art from the 1960s to the present (Johanne Sloan, principal investigator).

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Ken Lum

Artist and Professor, School of Design, University of Pennsylvania
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Ken Lum is an ArtCan Collaborator and a member of the Projects and Initiatives Working Group. He is an artist who has on occasion written and published, curated and organized symposia. He co-founded Yishu Journal of Contemporary Chinese Art and served as its founding editor. He co-curated the 7th Sharjah Biennial as well as Shanghai Modern: 1919 to 1945. He was project manager for an exhibition on post-colonial art and politics in Africa titled The Short Century: Independence and Liberation Movements in Africa: 1945-1994. He organized the symposium for Havana Biennale 7 and for Zerynthia Art Foundation in Serre Di Rapolano, Italy. He has given keynote addresses at the Universities Art Association of Canada conference in 1997, the 13th Sydney Biennale in 2002, and the World Museums Conference CIMAM held in Shanghai in 2010. He gave the commencement address to graduates of Whitman College, in Walla Walla, Washington in 2007. In 2013, Lum delivered a paper on Photography and Visual Culture for a Contemporary Art and Visual Culture conference organized by M+ Museum of Visual Culture and the Asia Society, both of Hong Kong. He also gave a paper on the artist Ian Wilson for the Dia Art Foundation in New York. He has completed public art commissions in Vienna, Utrecht, Vancouver, Leiden, St Moritz, St Louis and Toronto. He is working on public art commissions for Edmonton, Vancouver and two more for Toronto including the Canadian campaign in Italy WW2 memorial for Nathan Phillips Square. He is working on two large grant projects, one for an Ambiguous Monuments Festival for the city of Philadelphia and another involving a large Mellon Fellowship involving other UPenn and Yale Professors.He has exhibited in many exhibitions such as Documenta, Istanbul, Sao Paolo, Whitney Biennial, etc. Lum is a Killam Prize, Hnatyshyn Award and Guggenheim Fellowship winner.

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Erik Moore

Director, Electronic Text Centre, University of New Brunswick
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Erik Moore is an ArtCan Collaborator, a member of the Steering Committee, and Chair of the Digital Technology Working Group. He directs the Electronic Text Centre, which builds and maintains digital collections, works with UNB faculty to provide virtual research environments and online publications, produces electronic editions of academic journals, and supports research computing (with an emphasis in digital humanities). Hence, his broad area of interest would be electronic scholarly communication. Prior to this position, he worked for and with academic presses, library software vendors, and universities. Professional interests include: changes in scholarly publishing (especially Open Access), delivery and management of very large digital collections, digitization of cultural heritage, and digital preservation. He has an MSLIS from the University of Illinois, and his undergrad work at UNC was in both English and Russian literature.

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Erin Morton, Co-Investigator

Associate Professor, History of Visual Culture, Dept. of History, University of New Brunswick
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Erin Morton is the ArtCan Partner Representative from the University of New Brunswick, a member of the Executive Committee, and a member of the Steering Committee. Her research and teaching broadly examine the history of visual and material cultural production in North America from the nineteenth century to the present. She has co-curated exhibitions at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre in Kingston and until 2012 was an Executive Board of Gallery Connexion, Fredericton’s only artist-run centre. In 2011, she was appointed Secretary of the Executive Board of the Universities Art Association of Canada, the country’s national scholarly organization for the study of visual art. Morton is the former Director of UNB’s Faculty of Arts Internship: Community-Based Learning programme. She is also an active conference and workshop organizer and has experience in training and mentoring graduate and undergraduate research assistants. Her co-edited collection (with Lynda Jessup and Kirsty Robertson) Negotiations in a Vacant Lot: Studying the Visual in Canada was published by McGill-Queen's University Press in winter 2014.
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Charlene Quantz-Wold

Manager Operations, Walter Phillips Gallery, Banff International Curatorial Institute, The Banff Centre
Email

Charlene Quantz-Wold is the ArtCan Partner Representative from the Banff Centre and a member of the Public Outreach and Knowledge Transfer Working Group. She completed a degree in Museum Studies at the University of Calgary and since 2000 has held various roles at the Walter Phillips Gallery. She was the Program Manager responsible for overseeing the Visual Arts Creative Residency program and since 2009 has been the Operations Manager for the department as a whole, overseeing budgets, strategic planning, and partnerships for Creative Residencies at the Walter Phillips Gallery and the Banff International Curatorial Institute. Previous to her time in Banff, she worked at the Nickle Arts Museum, Calgary. She has been actively involved in Calgary’s artist-run centres, including serving for five years on the Board of Directors at TRUCK Contemporary Art. She chaired the Banff Culture Walk Committee and is a founding member of the Reel Time Film Committee that brings independent film to the Bow Valley community.

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Julia Skelly

Part-Time Faculty, Concordia University
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Julia Skelly is an ArtCan Collaborator, a member of the ArtCan Executive Committee, and a member of the Future Projects Working Group. She is the author of Wasted Looks: Addiction and British Visual Culture, 1751-1919 (Ashgate, 2014) and the editor of a collection of essays entitled The Uses of Excess in Visual and Material Culture, 1600-2010 (Ashgate, 2014). Her SSHRC postdoctoral research concerned Canadian temperance banners, and her current book-length project examines contemporary feminist textile artists in Australia, Britain, Canada, and the United States.

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Carla Taunton

Assistant Professor, Division of Art History and Critical Studies, Nova Scotia College of Art and Design University
Adjunct Assistant Professor, Cultural Studies Program, Queen’s University
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Carla Taunton is an ArtCan Collaborator, a member of the Steering Commitee, and Chair of the Projects and Initiatives Working Group. She is a co-investigator on The Kanata Indigenous Performance, New and Digital Media Art Project, a collaborative research partnership which traces Indigenous practices and methodologies in the areas of performance, digital and new media arts. She is also a co-organizer of the new Art and Activism Project at NSCAD University. In 2012, her Ph.D thesis “Performing Resistance/Negotiating Sovereignty: Indigenous Women’s Performance Art in Canada,” completed at Queen’s University, received the Governor General’s Gold Medal. Her areas of expertise include Indigenous arts and methodologies, contemporary Canadian art, museum and curatorial studies as well as theories of decolonization, anti-colonialism, and settler responsibility. Drawing on collaborative research models, her current research focuses on Indigenous arts-based approaches towards the socio-political projects of decolonization, indigenization and social-justice. Through this work she investigates current approaches towards the writing of indigenous-specific art histories, recent indigenous and settler research/arts collaborations, and strategies of creative-based interventions that challenge colonial narratives, national/ist institutions, and settler imagination. She is an Alliance Member of the Aboriginal Curatorial Collective and an independent curator.

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Daina Warren

Director, Urban Shaman Contemporary Aboriginal Art, Winnipeg
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Daina Warren is an ArtCan Collaborator and a member of the Projects and Initiatives Working Group. She is from the Montana Cree Nation in Hobbema, Alberta. In 2000, she was awarded Canada Council's Assistance to Aboriginal Curators for Residencies in the Visual Arts program to work with grunt gallery in Vancouver. This opportunity led to a permanent position with the artist-run centre as an associate curator and administrator until 2009. Warren then completed the Canada Council's Aboriginal Curatorial Residency at the National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa, where she curated the group exhibition Don’t Stop Me Now, which was on display until November 2011. She received her Bachelor’s degree from the Emily Carr Institute of Art and Design in 2003 and completed a Master's degree in Critical and Curatorial Studies at the University of British Columbia in 2012. She is currently the Director of Urban Shaman Contemporary Aboriginal Art Gallery in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

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